“No, I’m not gay”…I’m just not straight

My mother is a wonderful person who cares deeply about the rights of every human being. Although she initially told me being asexual was a phase I would grow out of, she is now my staunchest supporter. She wants to ensure that I feel comfortable with my sexuality and am treated with respect. She works that this same respect is given to everyone as a matter of course. I am grateful beyond words.

But I spent time visiting my grandfather who believes gay people shouldn’t get married and says he believes so because that’s how he was brought up. I don’t think he understands that being queer is not a choice. And, even more unfortunate, he doesn’t think to question why he holds the beliefs he does. Like my brother, he believes that because he has a right to his own opinions, this right extends to saying whatever he wants. He has no understanding of his privilege as a straight, white cisgender man. And I knew my grandfather was conservative (he watches Fox News religiously), but when I told him his comments were hurtful he did not understand.

“How am I being hurtful?” he asked.

“I have a lot of gay friends and they do not have the same rights that you do–”

He interrupted and turned to me. “Where did you meet these people?”

“At my college. I have a lot of gay friends and they deserve to be married and have lives for themselves. They’re great people.”

We went on for a bit, back and forth and getting nowhere. He assured me that if he were to meet any of my gay friends (as if being gay is always as visible as a birthmark or a scar) he would still treat them with courtesy. I wonder if this is worse: closeted homophobia. It certainly feels worse to be on the receiving end.

For years now, I was certain my grandfather has been waiting for me to come out as a lesbian. I have never dated and never showed any interest in boys so therefore the only option for me was lesbianism, in his view. And after all these years he finally asked me the big question:

“Tell me, then are you gay?”

And I stared at him and kept my face blank. “No. No, I am not.” I came so close to following my statement and revealing the truth that No, I’m not gay, but I’m not straight either. 

I’m queer. I’m asexual. I won’t bring home a woman on my arm anymore than I will bring home a man. But I didn’t say any of this and, though I know how lucky I am to have my mother on my side, I felt shoved into the closet. My grandfather and my aunt are my only immediate family I have not yet come out to. I am fortunate that I can easily pass as being straight.

Still, I don’t think my grandfather believed me when I told him I’m not gay. He asked me later that day about when I would want to get married and I told him that I don’t want to get married. He didn’t press the issue then and told me it is my decision–though he would have been able to hold a lovely wedding reception. I was not surprised when he brought up the issue of my refusal to marry to my mother. Again, I see how damaging closeted homophobia is. I fear my grandfather will never see me the same way and, even worse, he will never tell me so and our anger and misunderstanding will simmer away under the surface.

I know I am not the only one to feel closeted and to be concerned about coming out. I know I am incredibly lucky to have my mother as my support network. I know I care about queer issues beyond my own sphere and this conversation with my grandfather really brought homophobia home for me. I am even more dedicated to advocating for queer rights because no one deserves to suffer under homophobia or any other type of bigotry.

A few months ago I spoke on a “Queer + [Blank]” panel  where everyone who spoke came from a place of intersectionality. I have a shirt from the event that proudly displays “Queer + [Blank]” and I have yet to fill in my intersectionality because I am afraid to wear this short outside of my campus environment. When the panel was first being publicized I did not yet know that I was speaking and I talked with a queer friend of mine about the design for the shirts. She is very open about being a lesbian, but she said she had to ask herself whether or not she would want to walk down the street and have everyone know that she is queer. I agreed, but I felt I needed to do buy this shirt because I needed to embrace being queer as an essential part of my identity.

I do not know if I will come out to my grandfather anytime soon, but I will not get married–even if it means I stop entirely passing as straight.

 

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2 thoughts on ““No, I’m not gay”…I’m just not straight

  1. I also just read your posts “Identity is Fluid” and “That Escalated Quickly”. Thank you for writing down your experiences! I enjoy reading them.

    The need to have a somewhat public sexual identity always bothered me. One would think I would have no problems as I am straight by my biological nature, but still I never felt comfortable when my sexuality came up in group settings, as it is so often so case. The pressure to conform is just immense. (On the other hand I see the need to disclose one’s sexual orientation to attract potential partners.)

    I agree with you that sexual identity can be way more fluid than the rigid expectations people have. One reason why I am interested in asexuality is because I felt asexual myself for over a year in between long phases of heterosexuality. My sex drive vanished and I had no interest whatsoever in romance.

    At that time I felt scared to have “lost” my sexuality, I even considered that I would need medical help, and I was very relieved when it all came back to me and I was “normal” again..

    Only later I realized, that I had been quite happy during that time, that I had had lots of time and energy for work, friends and hobbies. The asexual way of life is in no way inferior and I admit that I want my old asexuality back from time to time.

    • Thank you for sharing and commenting! It’s always great to hear about the experiences of others. I’m grateful that you’re sharing from a perspective of how public sexual identity can be harmful.

      I think one of the aspects of asexuality I want to make known with my blog is that asexuality is a spectrum. A person can identify as ace whether they’re asexual and aromantic, asexual and romantic toward any gender or sex, or even just if they have a very low sex drive where sex isn’t very important to them.

      Again, thank you for your comment. I appreciate your input.

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