Wilde Interview: The Editor and Founder of Wilde Magazine on her Publication

I recently posted a blog highlighting the queer art and literary journal Wilde Magazine. Now I am lucky enough to have been able to interview the founder and editor of the Magazine, Nicole Wilkinson.

Here’s the complete transcript of our interview:

  1. Queer literary magazines have been around for a while already, what prompted Wilde to start now?

It began primarily as a personal endeavor. I was the editor of my high school literary magazine, as well as the vice-president of the GSA. As my senior year was coming to a close, I foresaw an emptiness that was bound to come once my involvement in these two groups had ended. So, I began to plan out Wilde Magazine, a magazine that would combine my need for involvement in the queer community, as well as my love of working on literary magazines. However, once I actually began to get to work on it and correspond with contributors and supporters of the magazine, I realized that Wilde was to be much bigger than a mere personal project.

2. How is Wilde different from other art and literary magazines which also focus on the queer experience?

3. Your website says that Wilde Magazine fosters discussion on the queer experience. Could you elaborate on that some more?

My answer for both of these questions is basically the same. The initial concept of Wilde was that it would feature a podcast, as well as have a forum where artists and writers could come and discuss their work, lives, and opinions. We wanted people to be able to workshop prior to submitting to the magazine so they could publish what they felt was made polished and perfect. Furthermore, earlier on we used to send back comments and critique to every person who submitted, whether we accepted or rejected them.

However, it took some time to find a stable group of staff members who had the time to stick with the magazine, so early on it was not possible to get the time or resources to keep the forum active (and clear out all of the spam we got there) and run the podcast. It also proved very difficult to give critique and comments to everyone who submitted, especially as the magazine got more popular.

However, all of these plans, the forum, the podcast, the critique, are simply on hiatus, and we ultimately plan to bring them back into the picture at some point in 2014.

4. What is Wilde’s take on allies writing about the queer experience and how it fits into the overall goal of the magazine?

I don’t want to say that we discourage straight people from submitting, because we don’t. However, Wilde is meant to be an extension of a queer space, and so in terms of having allies contribute or be on the staff of the magazine, we try to be very careful. In a queer space, allies should not try and overpower the opinion of queer people. It’s similar to when men enter feminist spaces – it’s important to insure that their voice will not overpower the group we’re trying to give a voice to. Rather, it is our hope that our straight allies who support the magazine would use it as inspiration to create more queer awareness in primarily heterosexual spaces and magazines.

We have published submissions from allies, and we have allies on our staff, but we try to make sure their voices and input are supported and backed by our queer contributors, supporters, and staff, as their voices are the most relevant in our mission. Therefore, we will always prioritize queer submissions over those from our straight allies.

5. Could you describe what you’re looking for in submissions? What best fits Wilde’s focus? Do you have any tips or advice for writers hoping to get published in Wilde?

Some people wonder if we are seeking submissions only related to queer issues, but as any queer person knows, being queer is only a part of our identity, and we have lives, and therefore art, that are just as varied as any other. We accept pieces explicitly related to the queer experience, we accept pieces where being queer is just an added spice to the piece, and we accept pieces that have nothing to do with queer issues.

It’s hard to say what we’re looking for exactly, because we are always blown away by the things we didn’t even know to look for. The totally unique characters, revolutionary story lines, art and writing we’d never seen before.

For those wanting to get published in Wilde, I would advise them to read previous issues of the magazine, to get a feel for our content.

Also, I would really advise them, as I would with any other publication, please read all of the guidelines, and please don’t disregard them. So many people submit incorrectly, so if you can show an editor and staff that you read and understood their directions, you’re already ahead half of the pack. If you can write a good cover letter as well, you’re ahead ¾ of everyone else.

6. What is the atmosphere like working for a magazine? Could you describe your staff and what a typical day is like?

That’s hard to say, as the staff and I don’t meet in person. I know a lot of them personally, and a good deal of us are from Colorado. We primarily work on the magazine individually and then correspond over Facebook, Skype, and e-mail. And the process we go through for submissions can span days, maybe weeks.

When a submission comes in, the advisory readers often look over it first. They leave comments for the editors and I to go off of. Then the editors and I look over it. Then, once we’ve sorted all of our submissions, I lay the magazine out, first on paper, then on InDesign. I send a rough copy to everyone on the staff and they point out errors and help polish it up.

I really admire the staff for all the work they put into the magazine, and their passion for art and writing. I get to work with a really dedicated group of people. I hope that one day I can meet them in person, like a big Wilde Staff reunion. That would be great.

7. In the upcoming years, where do you see Wilde Magazine heading? What are the future goals of the magazine?

We have big plans for the magazine.

We hope that in the near future, we can bring back the forum and start up the podcast next year.

We also hope to bring back critique and comments for those who specifically ask for it.

We want to eventually stop using HP Magcloud so we can print in bulk and offer the magazine for a much lower price, and make it available for sale at book stores, coffee shops, and any businesses willing to sell our publication.

However, after trying to manage these things early on when the magazine began, I’ve realized that it’s necessary to take small steps to reach these goals and expand. So, it may take time, but we’ll do our best to get there, so Wilde can be an affordable multimedia publication that serves, not only to exhibit the work of the queer community, but to create a discussion within it.

Thank you so much Nicole Wilkinson for sharing your work with this magazine! I know I am not the only one who values your input and the work you have done to make Wilde Magazine a growing success. Once again, thank you very much for your time.

If you have any more questions about Wilde Magazine, their submission guidelines or anything to do with this publication visit their website here. And just another reminder, issue #3 is available and can be purchased either in digital form or a print copy here.

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